Higher Learning Commission

Strategic Plan for Comprehensive Internationalization

University of Tulsa

Overview of the Quality Initiative

The University of Tulsa (TU) proposes our Strategic Plan for Comprehensive Internationalization (SPCI) as our Quality Initiative (QI) under the Open Pathway for Reaffirmation of Accreditation. See https://utulsa.edu/academics/internationalization/. This QI focuses on four milestones that will establish international, intercultural or global awareness as a central formative experience for TU undergraduate students.

TU adopted the SPCI in May 2011. We are now in the third year of implementation under a ten-year plan. While important progress has already been made on many recommendations, work continues in all areas with involvement of key constituents across campus. This QI focuses on four milestones that will establish international, intercultural or global awareness as central formative experiences for TU undergraduate students:

  1. Develop and fully implement the TU Global Scholars program.
  2. Deepen interdisciplinary teaching around critical global issues associated with TU’s existing research institutes, including energy, technology and environment; indigenous populations; community health; and entrepreneurship.
  3. Significantly increase participation in study abroad by developing education abroad tracks for each undergraduate major.
  4. Deepen the engagement between TU’s population of undergraduate international students and US-born students, both in and out of the classroom.

The SPCI identifies six strategic priorities for integrating international, intercultural and global dimensions into TU’s teaching, research and service activities:

  1. Develop international activities that support interdisciplinary initiatives.
  2. Deepen university programs in strategic geographic regions.
  3. Enhance recruitment of international students.
  4. Create programs that support TU’s commitment to recruit highly qualified undergraduate students.
  5. Establish centralized leadership for implementation of the SPCI.
  6. Address related infrastructure issues.

Sufficiency of the Scope and Significance of the Quality Initiative

This section addresses the relationship between the SPCI and TU’s mission, the process by which the SPCI was developed, and the rationale for specific milestones in this QI.

Internationalization as a Mission Driven Priority.

TU’s Mission Statement affirms our commitment to educate “men and women of diverse backgrounds and cultures” to “welcome the responsibility of citizenship, service and leadership in a changing world.” TU defines internationalization as “the process of integrating an international, intercultural or global dimension into the purpose, functions, or delivery of post-secondary education.”1 Our SPCI QI, therefore, is aligned and consistent with the mission of the University.

Strategic Planning Process.

In 2009, TU joined the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Internationalization Laboratory, a cohort of universities that works closely with ACE staff to develop internationalization goals and develop strategic plans. President Steadman Upham authorized the creation of an Internationalization Laboratory Steering Committee to be co-chaired by the then Associate Provost for Global Education and Chair of the Department of Geosciences.

During AY 2010-11, the steering committee and six subcommittees developed a thorough and inclusive portrait of TU’s level of international engagement. More than 80 faculty and staff, representing various campus constituencies, served on these committees. The committees collected data from stakeholders within and outside of the institution, completed an institutional self-study using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis, and developed recommendations that became the foundation of our strategic plan. In Fall 2010, the draft plan was presented to the campus through a series of “town hall” meetings. In December 2010, ACE staff chaired a peer review team that visited campus and provided feedback on the plan and its implementation. Following consultation with the Provost, Executive Vice President and Vice President for Institutional Advancement, the steering committee prepared a 10-year implementation plan and budget. In May 2011, the TU Board of Trustees approved the SPCI and implementation plan.

Establishing international, intercultural or global awareness as a central formative experience for TU undergraduate students.

This QI is both aspirational and responsive to unique and distinctive aspects of the TU campus experience, including changing demographics among TU undergraduate students. Over the last two decades, TU has been attracting undergraduate students with increasingly stronger academic backgrounds. They arrive with an expectation that an international component will be included in their educational experiences. Many enter with significant AP or IB credit hours that allow greater flexibility in crafting degree plans. At the same time, TU is recruiting a record number of international students who now comprise more than 25% of the student body. In AY 2012-13, TU engaged consultants to conduct an analysis of the University’s recruiting strategies. They recommended that TU focus on “providing a distinctive and comprehensive international experience that would define the institution. This would include not only study abroad, but a serious and systematic integration of international themes and experiences into the curriculum as well as maintenance of a relatively high percentage of international students on campus.”2

Clarity of the Purpose of the Quality Initiative

This section describes the four QI milestones, associated learning objectives and processes for assessment.

The Four Milestones.

The SPCI identifies four tightly integrated milestones that seek to establish international, intercultural or global awareness as a central formative experience for all undergraduate students.

Milestone 1: Develop and fully implement the TU Global Scholars program.

The TU Global Scholars program is a new, four-year interdisciplinary certificate program that challenges students to examine big global questions; study the impact of global issues on local communities; work in interdisciplinary teams to solve problems; communicate across language communities; and understand the role of their major in a global and interdisciplinary context. In October 2013, sixteen students, distributed across the three undergraduate colleges, were selected for the first class. In future years the program will recruit twenty-five students per class. Global Scholars will be recognized at graduation, and their participation will be noted on final transcripts. Scholarships of approximately $10,000 per student will be awarded to support group study abroad experiences as well as an additional semester of study abroad. See http://www.utulsa.edu/academics/Centers-and-Institutes/global-education/Global%20Scholars%20Program.aspx.

This program is based on the Seven Revolutions framework, key worldwide trends identified by the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) as critical to the question, “What will the world look like in 2035?”:

  1. Population: What effects will population growth/decline, aging, migration and urbanization have on our future world?
  2. Resources: What changes will we see in food, water and energy consumption/production?
  3. Technology: What changes are we going to see in computation, robotics, biotechnology and nanotechnology?
  4. Information: How does the vast amount of data change how we learn and govern in the future?
  5. Economies: How is our economic landscape changing?
  6. Conflict: How do we balance state competition/conflict with the increased pressures of transnational threats?
  7. Governance: What is the role of leaders, corporations and NGO’s in this new environment?3

Global Scholars will take three interdisciplinary courses that examine major drivers of global change. These courses will satisfy nine hours of TU’s block course (General Curriculum) requirements. The program will develop new interdisciplinary courses, e.g., “Global Challenges,” piloted in Spring 2014 and team taught by faculty in Sociology and Finance, and a Summer 2014 community-engaged study abroad course focusing on sustainability and urban development in Germany and Hungary.

In addition to their block courses, Global Scholars will be required to demonstrate proficiency in a second language and complete a semester abroad of study, work or research; a globally focused course within their major; and an independent capstone project that will be presented at the annual TU Research Colloquium.

The Global Scholars program is envisioned as a marquee program that could serve as a catalyst for related initiatives, including a significant “spillover” effort on other internationalization initiatives. For example, although some new interdisciplinary courses will be available only to Global Scholars, others will be open to any interested undergraduates. To support block courses, a Visiting Global Scholars lectureship will be created in cooperation with international partner universities. International scholars will be brought in from diverse backgrounds to teach in their respective areas of expertise, as related to the Seven Revolutions framework, and enrich the TU curriculum.

Milestone 2: Deepen interdisciplinary teaching around critical global issues associated with TU’s existing research institutes: energy, technology and the environment; indigenous populations; community health; and entrepreneurship.

TU will encourage interdisciplinary teaching associated with existing research institutes in which investments have already been made, and expand TU’s internationalization goals through these institutes. These institutes have global perspectives, and are influenced by and can influence governments and economies in other countries. We have already achieved some success in building interdisciplinary programs, such as the International Business and Language major offered through the Collins College of Business and Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences. Because both focus on interdisciplinary teaching, Milestone 2 and Milestone 1 are closely aligned. Milestone 2 will also include the following initiatives:

  1. Permanently fund Faculty Internationalization Grants to support the development of new courses, with particular attention to key interdisciplinary areas and engagement with international research collaborators.
  2. Examine institutional barriers, such as teaching loads, that may serve as disincentives for multidisciplinary collaborations.
  3. Identify necessary institutional resources, such as campus housing, for building a more robust visiting scholar program.

Milestone 3: Significantly increase participation in study abroad by developing education abroad tracks for each undergraduate major.

Milestone 3 seeks to increase the number of study abroad participants by improving the integration of study abroad with TU’s degree programs. Although participation numbers have increased rapidly during the past seven years – 220 students completed an international education experience in AY 2013-14, compared to 119 in AY 2006-07 – only 15% of TU undergraduate students graduate with a significant abroad experience. The largest group of participants in AY 2013-14 were undergraduates from the College of Arts and Sciences (40%), followed by the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences (23%) and College of Business (20%). About 61% took courses that counted toward their majors or minors, reflecting the desire of students to study abroad without delaying time to graduation.

The SPCI proposes to follow the model developed by the University of Minnesota – acknowledged internationally as the innovator of a successful model of study abroad curriculum integration – in which study abroad professionals, faculty and academic advisors collaborate to internationalize the undergraduate experience and to spread ownership for international education throughout the institution.4

TU has pledged to double participation in study abroad within five (5) years as part of the Generation Study Abroad initiative led by the Institute for International Education. A Generation Study Abroad task force has been created to examine opportunities and barriers to reaching these targets. A new Associate Dean for Global Education is responsible for collaborating with departments to develop learning objectives for students abroad, identify appropriate study abroad programs, develop advising materials, and regularly evaluate the effectiveness of particular program options in satisfying learning objectives.

Milestone 4: Deepen the engagement between TU’s significant population of undergraduate international students and US-born students both in and out of the classroom.

Milestone 4 seeks ways to maximize student learning by better engaging domestic and international students in a pluralistic classroom and campus environment. TU is ranked fifth nationally in total percentage of undergraduate international students, according to US News & World Report. In AY 2013-14, 25% of entering freshmen were international, with the largest cohorts coming from China, Saudi Arabia, India, Angola and Oman.

This diversity presents a unique opportunity for domestic and international students to engage meaningfully in international and intercultural experiences without leaving Tulsa. The experiences of international students at TU and other universities are sometimes different from those of domestic students. We will examine the curricular and co-curricular experiences that contribute to an inclusive campus environment and encourage positive intercultural and global learning. Specifically, we will include initiatives to enhance our students’ sense of shared community, faculty-student interactions and global perspective taking – all factors associated with how campuses successfully engage diverse communities – including:

  1. Reassessment of new student orientation and freshman year experiences: A task force will prepare recommendations for enhancing orientation of international students.
  2. Development of faculty resources for teaching in diverse classrooms: A faculty committee will collaborate with TU’s Henneke Center for Academic Fulfillment to develop online resources and workshops for faculty on improving student engagement.
  3. Professional development for staff working with international students: In AY 2013-14, TU’s Human Resources Office piloted a Global Community Staff Development program to provide resources to staff who work with international students. This program will undergo regular assessment for improvement.
  4. Expansion of campus leadership programs that encourage interaction between domestic and international students: We will review how major student leadership programs – such as service-learning and volunteer programs, International Living Center, orientation programs and TU Global Scholars – engage international students. A task force will review how domestic and international students engage on campus and benchmark with peer and aspirant institutions.
  5. Increase writing and communication support for international students: We will examine ways to expand services that linguistically prepare international students for classroom engagement, including services offered through the English Institute for International Students, Writing Center, and introductory post-matriculation writing courses.

Associated Learning Objectives.

The SPCI QI identifies four areas of student learning objectives:

  1. Knowledge. Students should gain understanding and demonstrate knowledge of:
    1. Global issues, processes and systems in context of history, economics, politics, religion and culture.
    2. Their own and other cultures within a global and comparative context.
    3. Ethical issues and debates, including those related to the challenges of relativism vs. universalism.
  2. Skills. Students should master the application of certain skills, including:
    1. Ability to navigate in other cultural and geographical environments.
    2. Use of global knowledge, cultural understanding and alternative perspectives to think critically and address problems broadly.
    3. Language ability as a vehicle to connect and communicate with people of other language communities, using speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.5
  3. Attitudes. Students should acquire attitudes necessary for welcoming a role in the global community, including:
    1. Self-awareness when engaged in dialogue about cultural complexities, similarities and differences.
    2. Appreciation of the language, art, religion, philosophy, technology and commerce of difference cultures.
    3. Ongoing willingness to seek out international or intercultural opportunities.
  4. Global Citizenship and Service. Students should demonstrate global competencies in knowledge, skills and attitude through their:
    1. Acceptance of responsibility for both the local and global communities.
    2. Application of their disciplines beyond the local environment.
    3. Inclusion of individuals from other countries and cultures in projects, activities and learning communities.

Processes for Assessment – Evaluating Progress and Accomplishments.

Our SPCI QI includes a structured plan for ongoing assessment and improvement.

  1. Learning Assessment. Learning objectives identified in the preceding section will undergo assessment as follows:
    1. As part of the TU’s Learning Assessment Project (TULAP) administered by the Office of University Assessment, AACU rubrics for global learning will be modified to assess student learning under SPCI initiatives. See http://www.utulsa.edu/academics/Office-of-the-Provost/Accreditation-and-Assessment/Assessment/Institutional%20Assessment.aspx These rubrics will also be used by the Global Scholars program to assess final portfolios of graduates.
    2. TU will use the Global Perspectives Index (GPI) to assess global learning and students’ cognitive, intrapersonal and interpersonal development, and measure interaction between domestic and international students. A baseline measure under the GPI was captured in 2013. In future years, the GPI will be conducted at the same time as NSSE under a three-year cycle.
    3. Student participation will be tracked in several areas, including study, research or internship abroad; new courses with international, intercultural or global components; and participation of international students in co-curricular activities.
    4. An assessment tool for language proficiency will be developed for students majoring in a foreign language and/or Global Scholars.
  2. External Evaluation. ACE will conduct a five-year peer review of TU’s progress in implementing the SPCI.
  3. Annual Process Improvement Review. The International Leadership Council (ILC) will review implementation of the SPCI annually, and prepare annual progress reports for the campus community with recommendations to modify the implementation timetable, as needed.

Table 1 outlines the relationship between learning objectives and program assessment:

 

Table 1.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES INPUTS OUTPUTS OUTCOMES

KNOWLEDGE

Students should gain understanding and demonstrate knowledge of:

$    Global issues, processes, trends and systems in context by history, economics, politics, religion and social systems

$    Their own and other cultures within global and comparative contexts

$    Ethical issues and debates including the challenges of relativism vs universalism

  1. Global Scholars program
  2. Interdisciplinary global block courses
  3. Visiting Global Scholars program
  4. Faculty Internationalization Grants for curriculum development
  5. Study abroad integrated into all degree programs
  6. Meaningful classroom interactions between domestic and international students
  7. International Living Center
  1. 1-2 Global Scholars block courses per semester
  2. 90% completion rate for Global Scholars program
  3. 100% of academic departments with study abroad tracks
  4. 440 participants per year in study abroad within 5 years
  5. Increased enrollment in courses with global or multicultural focus
   
  1. Demonstrate understanding of global systems and ability to apply knowledge to contemporary global issues – evidenced in Global Learning Value Rubric (GLVR), administered as part of university-wide assessment program (TULAP)
  2. (Global Scholars) Demonstrate application of knowledge to contemporary global issues – evidenced in GLVR, capstone project and portfolio

SKILLS

Students should master the application of certain skills, including

$  Ability to navigate in other cultures and geographical environments

$  Use of global knowledge, cultural understanding and alternative perspectives to think critically and address problems broadly

$  Ability to use language to connect and communicate with other language communities through speaking, listening, reading and writing

  1. Education abroad programs
  2. Global Scholars program
  3. Foreign language courses
  4. Interdisciplinary global block courses
  5. Visiting Global Scholars program
  6. Faculty Internationalization grants for curriculum development
  1. Increased enrollment in language classes
  2. Increased participation in annual Research Colloquium by students with projects developed abroad
  3. Growth in service-based abroad programs, such as Engineers Without Borders
   
  1. Demonstrated gains in language ability following study abroad – evidenced in language assessment instrument(s)
  2. Demonstrated understanding of cultural diversity and global systems – evidenced in GLVR (TULAP)
  3. (Global Scholars) Demonstrated ability to speak a second language at level equivalent to 4 semesters of college study – evidenced in language assessment instrument(s)
  4. (Global Scholars) Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge to contemporary global issues – evidenced in GLVR, capstone project and portfolio

ATTITUDES

Students should acquire the attitudes for welcoming a role in the global community, including

$  Self-awareness when engaged in dialogue about cultural complexities, similarities, differences

$  Appreciation of language, art, religion, philosophy, technology and commerce of different cultures

$  Willingness to seek out international and intercultural opportunities

  1. Cultural programming on campus
  2. Visiting Global Scholar lectureship
  3. International Living Center
  4. Study Abroad programs
  5. Foreign language courses
  6. Campus leadership programs that encourage domestic and international student interaction
  7. New student orientation and freshman year programming
  8. Meaningful classroom interactions between domestic and international students
  1. Participation rates of international students in co-curricular activities
  2. 1-2 Global Scholar block courses per semester
  3. Increased enrollment in courses with global or multicultural focus
  4. Increased enrollment in language courses
  5. Increased interest by domestic students for living in International Living Center
  
  1. Demonstrated ability to evaluate and apply diverse perspectives to complex subjects – evidenced in GLVR (TULAP)
  2. Increased engagement of students from different cultural backgrounds – evidenced in Global Perspectives Index (GPI)

CITIZENSHIP

& SERVICE

Students should demonstrate citizenship and service through global competencies in knowledge, skills and attitude through their

$  Acceptance of responsibility for both local and global communities

$  Application of their disciplines beyond the local environment

Inclusion of individuals from other communities in projects, activities and learning communities
  1. Global Scholars program
  2. Study abroad integrated into individual degree plans
  3. Faculty-led courses
  4. Campus leadership programs that encourage domestic and international student interaction
  1. 90% completion rate of Global Scholars
  2. 100% of academic departments with study abroad track
  3. Increased participation of international students in co-curricular activities
 
  1. Demonstrated willingness to take personal and social responsibility – evidenced in GLVR
  2. Demonstrated understanding of cultural diversity – evidenced in GLVR (TULAP)
  3. Increased engagement of students from different cultural backgrounds – evidenced in GPI

 

Evidence of Commitment to and Capacity for Accomplishing the Quality Initiative

The SPCI has been approved by the Board of Trustees, President, Provost, Vice Presidents, academic deans and Deans’ Council.

Leadership for Implementing Initiatives.

A number of individuals and groups will be directly involved and responsible for implementing the SPCI initiatives.

  1. Vice Provost for Global Education (VPGE). The VPGE serves as the University’s senior international officer and is responsible for leading implementation of the SPCI. This position was created in August 2011 and is filled by Dr. Cheryl Matherly, who has directed the University’s Center for Global Education since 2006.
  2. Internationalization Leadership Council (ILC). The ILC is comprised of faculty and staff charged with implementing specific SPCI recommendations in collaboration with the VPGE, e.g., reviewing assessment data and recommending adjustments to the implementation timeline. The ILC will produce annual reports to the campus. See http://www.utulsa.edu/academics/Office-of-the-Provost/internationalization-initiative/About%20the%20Internationalization%20Leadership%20Council.aspx
  3. Director of Global Scholars program (DGSP). This half-time position reports to the VPGE and was created in June 2013 to develop and oversee the Global Scholars program.
  4. Global Scholars Advisory Board. This nine-member faculty advisory board works with the DGSP and consults on program design, student selection and new course development for the Global Scholars program. Members are appointed by the collegiate deans.
  5. Associate Dean for Global Education (ADGE). This half-time position reports to the VPGE and was created in June 2013 to implement the study abroad curriculum integration project.
  6. Other Individuals and Groups. Other individuals and groups involved in implementation include all academic deans; Deans’ Council; Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services; Director of University Assessment; Dean for International Student Services; Associate Deans’ Council; Assistant Dean for Academic English Programs for International Students; and college curriculum review committees.

Human, Financial and Technological Resources.

The University is committed to providing the necessary human and financial resources for implementing the SPCI. As seed money for the first five years, President Upham committed $1.5 million from endowment funds. These funds are being used to create new faculty and staff lines, student scholarships and faculty incentive grants. These funds allow time for the University to incorporate these expenses into the general operating budget, and also to launch development activities for other SPCI initiatives. The Office of Institutional Advancement has designated a gift officer to develop a fundraising strategy for new initiatives.

Appropriateness of the Timeline for the Quality Initiative

Table 2, below, outlines the timeline for implementation, including updates since the plan was approved initially by the Board of Trustees in 2011. This document will be revised annually to reflect assessment data and emerging priorities. The following abbreviations (in alphabetical order) are used in Table 2:

ADAEP Assistant Dean for Academic English Programs
ADGE Associate Dean for Global Education
CGE Center for Global Education
DGS Director of Global Scholars Program
DISS Dean of International Student Services
GSAB Global Scholars Advisory Board
ILC Internationalization Leadership Council
TULAP Tulsa University Learning Assessment Program
VPEM Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services
VPGE Vice Provost for Global Education

 

Table 2.

ACTION ITEM

                                                       

RESPONSIBLE PERSONNEL NEW RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS DATE
Spring 2014
Hire associate dean for Global Education VPGE Salary + benefits

Spring 2014
Completed

Teach first interdisciplinary block course for TU Global Scholars DGS, co-instructor Student scholarships for study abroad Spring-Summer 2014 Completed
Baseline assessment of writing, communication skills of international students (to develop faculty teaching resources) ADAEP, DISS None

Spring 2014
Completed

Complete task force assessments on orientation and international student classroom engagement Deans’ Council None

Summer 2014
Completed

Launch Global Community Staff Development Program HR, Global Staff Development Subcommittee Shirts/Awards Luncheon (nominal)

Spring 2014
Completed
Annually thereafter

Award Faculty Internationalization grants for new course development, research collaborations ILC $40,000 per year

Spring 2014
Completed
Annually thereafter

Streamline processes for bringing visiting scholars to campus VPGE, DISS Reserved space in campus housing

Spring 2014
Completed

Pilot Global Learning Rubric through TULAP VPGE, DGS, Executive Director of University Assessment None

Spring 2014
Completed


AY 2014-15
Recruit second cohort of TU Global Scholars GSD, GSAB Marketing materials

Fall 2014

Annually thereafter

Hire study abroad advisor for CGE VPGE Salary + benefits

Fall 2014

Completed                 

Establish timeline for future Global Scholars block courses with commitments from existing faculty DGS, GSAB, collegiate deans and curriculum committees Course development resources Timeline to be developed
Develop online resources and workshops for faculty re: effectively engaging international and domestic students in the classroom Assistant Provost for Henneke Center, ADAEP, VPGE, ILC, DISS To be identified

Fall 2014 planning begins

Spring 2015 new resources published

Begin study abroad curriculum integration project with pilot departments ADGE, Colleges Travel funds for faculty to visit recommended programs

Fall 2014

Pending

Incremental rollout over 5-year period

Initiate enhancements to new student orientation programs VPEM, DISS To be identified Fall 2014
Launch Visiting Global Scholar Lectureship DGS, CGE Travel + stipend Spring 2015
Review capacity of TU database for central record-keeping of international activities Chief Information Officer, VPGE Costs associated with database upgrades, as needed Spring 2015
Assess campus global learning via GLVR and TULAP Executive Director of University Assessment, DGS, VPGE None Spring 2015
Assess Global Scholars portfolios GSD, GSAB None

Spring 2015

Annually thereafter

 

AY 2015-16

Conduct 5-year review of progress under SPCI VPGE, ILC Consultant fees Fall 2015
Conduct Global Perspectives Index (GPI) assessment DGS, VPGE, Executive Director of University Assessment Assessment instrument costs Spring 2016

AY 2016-17
Graduate first class of Global Scholars GSD, GSAB Nominal Spring 2016
 
 
 
1Knight, J. 2003. “Updating the definition of internationalization.” International Higher Education 33, p. 2.

2Private report, “Overall Positioning Strategy,” prepared by the Art & Science Group LLC, January 2012.

3Aughenbaugh, S., Falk, D., Moss, S., Shapiro, M. (2010). A Toolkit for Teaching Seven Revolutions. Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies.

4 University of Minnesota Learning Abroad Center: http://umabroad.umn.edu/professionals/curriculumintegration/general/

5 The TU Global Scholars program requires students to demonstrate proficiency in a second language, equivalent to four semesters of college study. The College of Arts and Sciences requires two years of foreign language study; the College of Business requires one year; and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences does not have a language requirement.
 

Institution Contact

Cheryl Matherly, Vice Provost, Global Education

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